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As I’ve shared before, in my first trimester, I used magnesium chloride flakes as part of my plan to combat morning sickness.  Magnesium is a mineral that’s needed for many functions in the body, including:

  • Healthy blood pressure levels
  • Normal muscle and nerve function
  • Strong immune system
  • Normal heart rhythm
  • Normal blood sugar levels
  • and more!

Only 1% of the body’s magnesium use is in the blood, so a blood test likely will not tell you if you are deficient.

Magnesium deficiency may cause:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Muscle aches
  • Irregular heart rhythm
  • High blood sugar/difficulty managing blood sugar levels
  • Mental confusion or fogginess
  • Fatigue
  • Non-restful sleep
  • Restless legs (especially at night)
  • Insomnia/difficulty sleeping
  • Seizures
  • Low levels of calcium and/or potassium in the blood

In the first trimester, when your body is rapidly building every organ system in your baby’s body, you go through nutrients quickly.  Magnesium is one of the major ones, and one that most of us are deficient in anyway.   Plus, the early signs of magnesium deficiency are the same as morning sickness!  (I definitely experienced those in my first trimester when I knew my magnesium levels were getting low, and supplementing via a bath typically improved this.)

Magnesium also isn’t easily absorbed orally.  Most of it passes through, which causes diarrhea for many (it’s an effective laxative though!).  The best way to absorb magnesium is through your skin.

Doing a foot bath or a tub bath, preferably with magnesium chloride flakes (which are better absorbed than Epsom salts, or magnesium sulfate), can definitely help.  However, it’s expensive, as you’re pouring up to 2 c. of the flakes into a tub and washing them away when you’re done.

A more cost-effective way is to make this magnesium oil spray, and use on thinner-skinned areas (inside of thighs, upper arms, stomach, etc.) as needed.

You will need:

  • 1 c. magnesium chloride flakes
  • 1 c. filtered water
  • A spray bottle or glass jar

Directions:

Gather up your supplies (I don’t have a spray bottle yet so I’m storing in a glass mason jar for now).

Heat the water gently.  It does not need to be boiling, only warm (100 degrees or so).

Add your magnesium flakes to a glass jar (even if you’ll pour the finished mix into a spray bottle).

Pour the warm water in on top of the flakes.

Use a small wooden spoon (or a non-reactive metal) to stir this until dissolved — it should only take a minute.  You could also put a lid on it and shake it, I think.

That’s it!  Pour into a spray bottle and use as needed.  The entire bottle has around 20g of magnesium in it.  I can only estimate how much is in a spray, but I think around 100mg or so.   Pregnant women need about 350mg per day (ages 19 – 30 — older and younger women need a bit more).  Use as needed on the thinner areas of skin.

**This post has been entered in Frugal Days and Sustainable Ways.**

Have you ever made or do you use magnesium oil?  Has it helped you or how are you hoping it will help?

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This is the writings of:

Kate is wife to Ben and mommy to Bekah (5), Daniel (4), Jacob (2), and Nathan (born March 2013). She is passionate about God, health, and food. She has written 7 cookbooks and a book entitled A Practical Guide to Children's Health. When she's not blogging, she's in the kitchen, sewing, or homeschooling her children. You can also find her as a contributor at Keeper of the Home.

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39 Comments

  1. Where do you get the magnesium flakes from?

    Reply

  2. Thank you so much for this! I just made some! I’ve been having a very strange combination of symptoms. I think a magnesium deficiency may be part of the problem…

    Reply

  3. Hey sounds great, although this is a salt solution, not an oil.

    Reply

  4. What do you make of the premixed Ancient Minerals Ultra Pure Magnesium Oil? Is it just as good, or should I buy the flakes and make my own? Thanks so much for posting all of this!

    Reply

  5. I love this recipe! This is a considerable savings compared with the AM 8oz. spray I just bought for $20! Would you put this on your pregnant belly? Or anywhere else in particular with thin skin? Do you wash it off after twenty minutes and why or why not? Also, do you spread out your dosage during the day or just do it once a day? I started using about 24 squirts (12 in the morning/12 at night) a day since 8/17 and my nighttime leg cramps have diminished and I am getting a more fitful nighttime sleep.

    Reply

    • Yes, I do put it on my belly, and my thighs. I just do it before bed. I don’t wash it off; I just let it absorb into my skin (it’s a little sticky feeling but doesn’t bother me). I had to back off and do only 2 – 3 sprays because I tend to be very sensitive to everything. See what amount works best for you!

      Reply

  6. We have been doing Epsom salt baths on my daughter who has eczema, I think I will try the spray or at least putting the flakes in her bathwater instead of the salts.

    THANK YOU!

    Reply

  7. Hi -
    I just made this at home. The only magnesium I could find was granular. I made it on the stovetop and it did break down the crystals and melted them. However, once the mixture cooled enough to put into a spray bottle, half of it had re-crystalized. Darn! I still bottled the liquid and use it. but I think it is still crystalizing within the opaque bottle. Could you contact me and give me suggestions on what to do? I know it has helped by sleeping at night. I have been a perpetual once-a-night-wake-up-and-pea girl for forever!

    Please help,
    Paula

    Reply

  8. [...] I just purchased Magesium bath flakes from Ancient Minerals to use in a bath and make my own oil [...]

    Reply

  9. Can you put to much on? and how would you know if you over did it? =)

    Reply

  10. I am curious about the dosing. I was looking at some of the spray magnesium oil on Amazon and they say “ultra saturated” but the dose is about 30 sprays! So I am wondering if 3-4 sprays of this is really enough… I made some of this. I don’t have a spray bottle so I am just dipping my fingers in it and rubbing onto my arms. I have been using quite a liberal amount and not had the GI *ahem* upset that is a sign of too much. Just thought I would point out that I am thinking that the estimation off 100mg per spray could be very much on the small side…

    Reply

  11. Oh and I was reading all the reviews on oils and people said the itching/sensitivity goes away once your body gets used to it. They suggest applying it, letting It sit for 15 minutes, then wiping it off.

    Reply

  12. [...] the easiest, quickest, and most cost-effective way to get magnesium into your body.  You can even make your own, and it’s very easy and very [...]

    Reply

  13. MAM, is it okay to use epsom salt to make magnesium oil? I cannot find magnesium chloride, only magnesium sulfate. (I’m in Canada).

    Reply

    • I am not sure how it would go. I think the magnesium chloride is the best absorbed. Perhaps you can find it online? Ancient Minerals is the usually recommended brand.

      Reply

      • Thanks :) We have a brand here in Canada that is very similar to Ancient Minerals. It is called Natural Calm. They make the oil but do not sell the flakes. You are right that magnesium chloride is best absorbed. Thanks for the reply :)

        Reply

    • I just received my shipment of flakes and will be making some mag oil soon. I am in Canada and ordered from http://www.magnascent.ca/0000pg.asp/ID/44212/SID/6414 website. They are the most resonably priced that I have seen so far. It came in a week’s time. They are in Ontario.

      Reply

  14. [...] number of articles (Wellness Mama, Mommypotamus, Modern Alternative Mama) suggest that morning sickness may be (among other things) the consequence of a magnesium deficit. [...]

    Reply

  15. [...] your magnesium oil, if you haven’t already.  Find the directions here.  You will not use all of it for this recipe, so save the rest for another [...]

    Reply

  16. I’ve been using magnesium spray for awhile now, and I must say: the stuff is amazing. Hubby is on Coumadin in preparation for a heart procedure, and if he has a banana a day and daily doses of the magnesium oil, he doesn’t wake up screaming in the night with leg cramps (THAT was not a fun night).
    Also, when I’ve been out pounding the pavement (all-day and upside-down housecleaning/getting ready for Christmas/etc), my feet are in terrible pain. I sat down one night on the edge of the tub, and sprayed a few sprays on the bottoms of my aching feet–and they were not quite like new, but felt better immediately, even before I massaged the feet, and they didn’t feel “broken” the next morning. I have all sorts of foot problems from hammer toes to bunion to high and strained arches that cause my feet to be really painful in the morning, but no longer with magnesium oil, and I have found that it absorbs through the hands and feet QUITE effectively, and with less sting unless there’s an open scratch or cut.

    Reply

  17. I am looking into this as a natural remedy/treatment for our son’s “ADHD”…we have avoided medicating him but are at a point where we need to do something…We had been using a magnesium oral supplement with little effect. About how long would a bottle of the oil last at 2-3 sprays a day? Trying to see how cost effective this is :)

    Reply

    • Oh, a very long time…I think when I was using 5 – 8 sprays it lasted 3 – 4 months? It’s fairly cost-effective. Even more so as a lotion and doesn’t dry the skin out.

      Reply

  18. there are a few other brands on amazon with the magnesium chloride flakes now. is there a way to know if one is better than the other or should they be about the same?

    Reply

  19. [...] the early morning….I forgot how much those things hurt! Time to remember to slather on some magnesium oil or lotion every night. The nights I use this, I have no leg cramps! Still having minimal back pain [...]

    Reply

  20. [...] important mineral in our water supply. To combat this, simply follow Kate’s advice on how to make your own magnesium oil or lotion and massage into your skin generously! It might leave a little tingle – but [...]

    Reply

  21. [...] through their small intestines and should perhaps supplement their magnesium with something like an oil or [...]

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  22. I made some magnesium oil and your lotion in my quest to battle my chronic lower back pain — and it helps as long as I get enough of the stuff on. My dad and I are both extremely sensitive to oral magnesium (midwife gave it to me during labor to combat elevated blood pressure and the results were worse than the entire labor process). But I don’t even get itchy with the plain oil. Awesome. Two questions:

    (1) Is there a way to make an even *more* concentrated oil?
    (2) Would any kind of spray bottle work for the oil? Is there something (frugal) you recommend? I don’t have any glass spray bottles to repurpose, so I’m wondering if any kind of plastic would be OK for storage. Right now it’s in a mason jar and we dip our fingers in to get some, but that’s messy.

    Reply

  23. Hi! I have a couple questions. Just got blood results back and my magnesium level is 1.8. From what I understand this is borderline or almost borderline deficient. I do understand a blood test isn’t accurate, but I already purchased magnesium capsules to take. They contain Magnesium Oxide, Magnesium Citrate and Magnesium Aspartate. So, do you think taking this orally would suffice in my situation? I have adequate B-12, B-6 and I’m assuming Vitamin D levels since I am in the sun a lot. Second question: can I hypothetically make a magnesium solution to apply topically with the capsules I already purchased? Or does it need to be the flakes? In the recent year or so I have had a really healthy diet; raw milk, bone broth, green leafy veggies, pink Himalayan sea salt, pastured eggs. Really trying to avoid MS! Thank you so much.

    Reply

  24. First, I LOVE reading your posts! Second, do you know if it matters what type of magnesium you use? I started taking Natural Calm which is a magnesium citrate you mix with water. Any idea if that would work for making the spray?

    Reply

  25. [...] I just purchased Ancient Minerals Magnesium Bath Flakes  from Ancient Minerals to use in a bath and make my own oil [...]

    Reply

  26. [...] How can you get more magnesium into your body? Unfortunately, the body is not well-equipped to absorb the majority of its magnesium through food sources. Although there are foods rich in magnesium, such as raw cacao, pumpkin seeds, cashews, and halibut, it’s wise to consider supplemental sources that aren’t taken orally. Pure Magnesium Oil is very inexpensive and easy to find. An even cheaper route is to make your own magnesium oil. [...]

    Reply

  27. [...] using it.  First, through baths (Epsom salts, initially, and later magnesium chloride), then magnesium oil, and finally magnesium [...]

    Reply

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